Avio Aero 3Dprints parts for the Catalyst engine for the Cessna Denali

Up to ten GE Catalyst components will be produced in this area. The engine’s first flight is scheduled for the end of 2019. It is the first turboprop engine in the world with almost 30% of its internal metal parts 3D printed. In Brindisi, work has already begun on three of these ten additive components. This number will continue to grow as the number of GE Additive-Concept Laser machines DMLM (Direct Metal Laser Melting) does. Continue reading “Avio Aero 3Dprints parts for the Catalyst engine for the Cessna Denali”

Dutch Railways starts using 3D printed spare parts for trains

3D printed spare parts for trains

Dutch Railways starts using 3D printed spare parts for trains

Nederlandse Spoorwegen (NS, Dutch Railways) is taking advantage of 3D printing and will replace some broken train parts with 3D printed replacement parts. In fact, 20 3D printed spare parts are currently available and NS plans to produce more than 50 by the end of the year. Continue reading “Dutch Railways starts using 3D printed spare parts for trains”

TU/e researcher develops mechanistic model to keep 3D printed concrete walls stable

3D printed concrete walls

A professor of Applied Mechanics at the Eindhoven University of Technology in the Netherlands has developed a model for determining the dimensions and printing speeds needed to keep 3D printed concrete walls stable.

Construction 3D printing is an exciting area of additive manufacturing, but 3D printing with concrete-type materials doesn’t come without its problems. This is basically because 3D printed concrete is asked to do a lot more work than it is used to: while normal concrete deposited in formwork can harden over several weeks, 3D printed concrete needs to carry the burden of the next layer almost immediately after its deposition. Continue reading “TU/e researcher develops mechanistic model to keep 3D printed concrete walls stable”

Autonomous 3D scanner determines 3D printability of objects in real time

Autonomous 3D scanner

Let’s say the armrest is broken in your vintage car. As things stand, you would need a lot of luck and persistence to find the right spare part. But in the world of Industrie 4.0 and production with batch sizes of one, you can simply scan the armrest and print it out. This is made possible by the first ever 3D scanner capable of working autonomously and in real time.

Part of the charm of vintage cars is that they stopped making them long ago, so it is special when you do see one out on the roads. If something breaks or stops working in the vehicle, however, this special status quickly becomes a problem, as spare parts are no longer manufactured either. With the advent of Industrie 4.0, this is set to change: manufacturing is turning toward batch sizes of one and individualized production. This is sometimes also referred to as “highly customized mass production.” Continue reading “Autonomous 3D scanner determines 3D printability of objects in real time”

Spare parts stored digitally & 3D printed when needed, a competitive advantage (Video)

digital spare parts

Spare parts stored digitally & 3D printed when needed, a competitive advantage

Five percent of spare parts could currently be stored in digital warehouses. This would make parts more quickly and easily available, while creating considerable cost savings. Digitalisation will also enable individual customisation and an increase in the intelligence of parts. 

A two-year project involving companies, and led by VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland and Aalto University, investigated how businesses can gain a competitive advantage from digital spare parts.

Spare parts and all of the related information can be stored and transferred digitally. Availability increases when a new spare part can be 3D-printed according to need, close to the end user.

“Industry now has every opportunity to boost business by making spare parts into a focus area of development. Around five percent of parts can currently be manufactured digitally, according to need. 3D printing technology has reached the stage where high-quality manufacturing is possible,” says Sini Metsä-Kortelainen, VTT’s project manager for the project. Continue reading “Spare parts stored digitally & 3D printed when needed, a competitive advantage (Video)”

3D Scanning & 3D Printing to keep Dutch vessels at top condition

Dutch vessels

3D Scanning & 3D Printing to keep Dutch vessels at top condition

Keeping its vessels in top condition is a critical aspect of a naval force’s readiness, but to do so each part, little or big, needs full attention. Claire Apthorp looks at a project to scan the entire Dutch Navy in 3D.

The Royal Netherlands Navy contracts work for the maintenance of its vessels and submarines to Dutch organisation Marinebedrijf Koninklijke Marine. In addition to maintaining the vessels, Marinebedrijf Koninklijke Marine is responsible for creating new parts for the ships to replace damaged parts, and carrying out modifications to on-board components when required, from everything to the hull to weapons systems and engines.

In order to speed up its servicing, Marinebedrijf Koninklijke Marine turned to Artec 3D, a company that produces 3D scanners that allow maintenance personnel to reverse engineer parts for vessels that need to be replaced, for which the drawings or 3D CAD files are not accessible. Continue reading “3D Scanning & 3D Printing to keep Dutch vessels at top condition”

Tikcit is registration platform partner of 3D Printing Design & Engineering conference

tikcit

Tikcit is registration platform partner of 3D Printing Design & Engineering conference,wich took place on May 24, 2016 at Designhuis in Eindhoven, The Netherlands.

About Tikcit
Organising an event implies many issues, from ticketing to e-payments, from statistics to ordering supplies, from surveys to social media and many many more. Tikcit is the platform to support you. Continue reading “Tikcit is registration platform partner of 3D Printing Design & Engineering conference”

Powered by a chemical reaction controlled by microfluidics, 3D-printed ‘octobot’ has no electronics (Video)

octobot

Octobot is the first autonomous, entirely soft robot. Powered by a chemical reaction controlled by microfluidics, 3D-printed ‘octobot’ has no electronics.

A team of Harvard University researchers with expertise in 3D printing, mechanical engineering, and microfluidics has demonstrated the first autonomous, untethered, entirely soft robot. This small, 3D-printed robot — nicknamed the octobot — could pave the way for a new generation of completely soft, autonomous machines. Continue reading “Powered by a chemical reaction controlled by microfluidics, 3D-printed ‘octobot’ has no electronics (Video)”

Expansion of 3D printing operations planned by UPS

UPS

Expansion of 3D printing operations planned by UPS (United Parcel Service). They plan to expand its 3D printing service to Asia and Europe, the U.S. shipping company has told Reuters, in a bid to fully embrace and get ahead of a trend that threatens to eat away a small but lucrative part of its business.

Aside from its main package delivery service, United Parcel Service gets an undisclosed portion of its revenue from storing and shipping parts for manufactures. If those customers were to switch to 3D printing their own parts, that business would face a drastic reduction. Continue reading “Expansion of 3D printing operations planned by UPS”